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Ancestry Question?

Author :

Submitted : 2018-06-14 18:47:19    Popularity:     

Tags: Ancestry  Question  

Update: My father is Irish and my mother is English. I married my husband and his mother has a french last name.
Recently, his sister did a DNA test. It came out that they are English and Irish and only abou 3% western Europe.
I am a bit

Answers:

The English and Irish intermingled all the time throughout much of history. The only way to know your family history and genealogy (who you are related to) is to do the research or pay someone to do it for you, which can get very expensive very quickly. (Professional genealogists charge on average US$20-$23+ an hour.) Start with yourself and work your way backwards, one generation at a time. Gather up your records, such as a birth certificate, marriage certificate (if applicable), newspaper articles and clippings regarding some of your accomplishments, journal entries, etc. Do the same for your parents, grandparents, etc.

This man can explain rather well. /www.youtube.com/watch?v=9g-VwtRd8ks

all humans are related. Genetics don't come in percentages.

You have 47 independently passed on packages of DNA. Your husband and his sister will share about 23 chromosomes (plus the mitochondrial DNA from their mother).

A chromosome being common in one area and another one being common in the same area does not mean you are closely related

You have greater things to worry about, most doubtful that you are related.

> Does that mean we are related?
Probably, but not close enough to matter. If you share a set of grandparents, you are first cousins. If you don't, you are no closer than 2nd cousin, and you're probably not that, either. (You're second cousins if you have a common pair of great grandparents.)

To worry about birth defects, you have to marry your niece or nephew for three or four generations, like the Hapsburgs did.

People who do not do genealogy worry that if they marry anyone closer than 14th cousin, their children will come out deformed. Those of us who do genealogy know that even children of first cousins are usually (94% of the time) normal. By contrast, children of people who are not first cousins are normal 97% of the time.

The ONLY way you will know if your share any common ancestor/s is if you research the real records that everyone generates during their lifetime and surnames are nothing at all to do with 'being related' or your ancestry, just like first names they were when taken chosen/given, so just like if your given name is Mary you are not related to all the other people called Mary.

Not sure why you assume you are related after taking a DNA test which is just sold for entertainment purposes and you already know you are not first cousins which is a close descent however that is perfectly legal to marry 1st cousins( share 1 set of grandparents) in the UK/Ireland as well as 95% of other countries, the rest are some US states that allow 2nd cousin( share 1 set of great grandparents) marriages

You should know even if he was your 2nd cousin you’d have no blood relation.

It Deals with checking your family’s history as far back as you can. Don’t worry you can get your DNA checked.

Millions of us have roughly the same ancestry!
Most British people are descended from a very small number of ancestors because the population was really small in the distant past.
Unless you and your husband are first cousins - which I'm sure you'd know about - there is nothing to worry about.

I'm fairly sure you are, on some level.

One in ten Scotsmen have a Y chromosome which shows a direct, male descent from the same 5th century Irishman. There are estimates that place the number of people with this same Y chromosome at three million, including 20% of certain parts of northwest Ireland.

And those are just men in an unbroken male line. Once you figure in the odds of the maternal grandfather having that genetic marker, as well as every other male ancestor, you come close to being sure that all Scotsmen and Irishmen are related.


I mention this to demonstrate just how interrelated we all are.

So even without a quasi-scientific test (they're really not that accurate at the hundred bucks level.) you can assume that most people are related in an isolated area over thousands of years.

And it doesn't really matter. Unless you're from a limited number of very inbred societies, such as Iceland, Arabs, or Ashkenazi Jews, this isn't likely to result in a higher than average number of troublesome genetic flaws. Even second cousin marriages don't generally produce many genetic problems, unless reinforced over generations.



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