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Is DNA testing for ethnicity accurate?

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Submitted : 2018-06-14 19:03:06    Popularity:     

Tags: testing  DNA  accurate  ethnicity  

I would like to help my grandma find out some of her paternal ancestry. Her father was adopted and , but they don't know anything about his family. I have joined ancestry.com, but I am not finding much. I would like to see a genealogist as well, but a

Answers:

IT is accurate only to the extent that the database being used for comparison is extensive. Some are much larger than others and there have more information to use as a comparison.

Ethnicity is your culture: language you speak at home, how you dress, what you eat, customs, traditions, what stories you tell children, religion, how you celebrate holidays, and so forth. That is not in DNA.

Yes and no. There was a program recently about twins that both did that and while their DNA sequences were identical as they should have been, each was calculated to have differing amounts of ancestry from different areas. If you are looking for general answers, they are good, if you want precise information they are not that.

The accuracy has a lot to do with the population groups they have in their database in which to compare you. Each company has its own population groups to do the comparison and actually it has been reported if you go back and have the same company to test you again sometime later by that time they have received more population groups that can alter your picture.

Also if you and a full sibling who is not an identical twin are tested by the same company at the same time the results will not be exact. That is because what is used is Autosomal DNA along with the X. Most of your DNA is Autosomal. 44 of your 46 chromosomes are Autosomal and you got it 50-50 from both parents but not 25% from each of your 4 grandparents. The reason why when your parents passed on the Autosomal they received from their parents to you, it was randomly jumbled and recombined. They call this "meoisis." How you inherited the bias will not be how your siblings who are not identical twins inherited it. You and your full siblings who are not identical twins got different chunks of Autosomal DNA from your parents. Understand "meoisis" has been going on in your ancestry from the beginning. This means you can have an ancestry but not the DNA from that ancestry but your brothers and sisters can have the DNA.

http://genetics.thetech.org/ask-a-geneticist/same-parents-different-ancestry

You might have to cut and paste the link into your browser.

I might add Y & Mitochondrial testing which has been done for years is more precise. The only thing about it it represent a minute portion of your total ancestry. If you are a male you got Y from your father, his father, his father and so on, no spouses are included. If you are a female you did not get Y. Both males and females get Mitochondrial from their mother, her mother her mother and so on. No spouses are included. So since you have 32 great great great grandparents, if you are a male and had both done, 30 of them will not be part of your picture. If you are a female and only had Mitochondrial done, 31 of them will not be part of your picture. Since Y & Mitochondrial have been tested long before Autosomal along with the X, a lot people do not know there is any other DNA.

You have 46 chromosomes, 44 Autosomal and 2 sex chromosomes. A male get Y from his father and X from his mother. A female normally gets X from both parents. Mitohondrial is not a chromosome but in the connective tissues outside your cells (cytoplasm). The 44 Autosomal which everyone gets is the DNA that determines your "looks" genetically as well as anomalies in your DNA that might lead to health issues.

The real value of genealogy DNA testing is if you are into traditional genealogy work using documents/records and if the company you choose has tested cousins of yours going back several generations and they notify you of those cousins and you make contact with them and they are also into traditional genealogy work, then you can collaborate information with them. They might have discovered records and ancestors you haven't and you might have discovered record and ancestors they haven't. This possibly could be helpful in your grandmother's situation. Understand a lot of adoptions long ago were not always authorized by a court but a family took in an orphan child from their deceased relative and that child took the name of the family.

DNA CAN TELL US THINGS OF WHICH A FAMILY TREE CAN NOT--BECAUSE THE BLOOD DOES NOT LIE.

I would attempt to research her family myself. Hiring a competent Genealogist can be VERY expensive and there is no guarantee they could find something you cannot. DNA might work.

In my experience it's fairly accurate, for what I know about my actual family history and the history of the ethnic groups that intermixed with the British... That was ancestry DNA that gave me pretty much every ethnic group in Europe and a few trace regions in Asia and North Africa. But then I did My heritage and It was less diverse and even gave me a few trace regions that ancestry didn't but overall my highest results were the same.

Bottom line though you'll love the result your grandmother will get. Ancestry does do genetic communities which I've heard are very accurate. It will tie your general ethnic makeup with your genetic community. Ancestry does have a higher user population which will give you better opportunities to connect with distant relatives . You're just like me in the way that my gran was adopted so I've been messaging all my cousins, all the way to my 5-8ths and I think I'm getting close to finding actual descendants from my grans line. Good luck with your journey.

Well, the best I can tell you is that the tests I took (I tried both Ancestry.com and 23 and Me) came back with precisely the ancestry my family knew we had. We're very knowledgeable about our family history, so I was just trying to figure out whether these tests really work. And since they told me exactly what I already knew, I have to say that they are at least reasonably good.

My husband tried Ancestry.com and got pretty much what he was expecting, too, though with some minor surprises. He is Jewish, and the test confirmed that, but he turned out to have rather more non-Jewish ancestry than he'd anticipated.



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