Actions

  Print Article
  BookMark Article

Categories    Category List

Arts & Humanities
  Books & Authors
  Dancing
  Genealogy
  History
  Performing Arts
  Philosophy
  Poetry
  Theater & Acting
  Visual Arts
Beauty & Style
  Fashion & Accessories
  Hair
  Makeup
  Skin & Body
Business & Finance
  Advertising & Marketing
  Careers & Employment
  Corporations
  Credit
  Insurance
  Investing
  Personal Finance
  Renting & Real Estate
  Small Business
  Taxes
Cars & Transportation
  Aircraft
  Boats & Boating
  Car
  Insurance & Registration
  Maintenance & Repairs
  Motorcycles
  Rail
Computers & Internet
  Computer Networking
  Hardware
  Internet
  Programming & Design
  Security
  Software
Consumer Electronics
  Camcorders
  Cameras
  Cell Phones & Plans
  Games & Gear
  Home Theater
  Music & Music Players
  PDAs & Handhelds
  TVs
Dining Out
Education & Reference
  Financial Aid
  Higher Education
  Preschool
  Primary & Secondary Education
  Special Education
  Studying Abroad
  Teaching
Entertainment & Music
  Celebrities
  Comics & Animation
  Horoscopes
  Jokes & Riddles
  Magazines
  Movies
  Music
  Polls & Surveys
  Radio
  Television
Environment
  Alternative Fuel Vehicles
  Conservation
  Global Warming
  Green Living
Family & Relationships
  Family
  Friends
  Marriage & Divorce
  Singles & Dating
  Weddings
Food & Drink
  Beer, Wine & Spirits
  Cooking & Recipes
  Ethnic Cuisine
  Vegetarian & Vegan
Games & Recreation
  Amusement Parks
  Board Games
  Card Games
  Gambling
  Hobbies & Crafts
  Toys
  Video & Online Games
Health
  Alternative Medicine
  Dental
  Diet & Fitness
  Diseases & Conditions
  General Health Care
  Men's Health
  Mental Health
  Optical
  Women's Health
Home & Garden
  Cleaning & Laundry
  Decorating & Remodeling
  Do It Yourself (DIY)
  Garden & Landscape
  Maintenance & Repairs
Local Businesses
News & Events
  Current Events
  Media & Journalism
Pets
Politics & Government
  Civic Participation
  Elections
  Embassies & Consulates
  Government
  Immigration
  International Organizations
  Law & Ethics
  Military
  Politics
Pregnancy & Parenting
  Adolescent
  Adoption
  Baby Names
  Newborn & Baby
  Parenting
  Pregnancy
  Toddler & Preschooler
  Trying to Conceive
Science & Mathematics
  Agriculture
  Astronomy & Space
  Biology
  Botany
  Chemistry
  Earth Sciences & Geology
  Engineering
  Geography
  Mathematics
  Medicine
  Physics
  Weather
  Zoology
Social Science
  Anthropology
  Dream Interpretation
  Economics
  Gender Studies
  Psychology
  Sociology
Society & Culture
  Community Service
  Cultures & Groups
  Etiquette
  Holidays
  Languages
  Mythology & Folklore
  Religion & Spirituality
  Royalty
Sports
Travel

Online Now    Online Now

Author Login    Author Login

Welcome Guest! Please login or create an account.

Username:

Password:



Navigation    Navigation

ADS    Featured Author

ad

ADSDisclosure

Did Caligula really do all the things that he is accused off?

Author :

Submitted : 2018-06-14 21:15:01    Popularity:     

Tags: Caligula  accused  

That he named his horse consul? That he was in an incestuous relationship with his sister Drusilla? And that he declared her a goddess after her death? That he ordered the Roman legions to pick up sea shells instead of invading Britain? Seems all rathe

Answers:

He probably had what we now call schizophrenia. Since there was no treatment for that in his day.....yeah-he was probably very crazy. I have no idea why we can regularly find homeless victims of this mental illness wandering around the streets today, but somehow it is impossible that a historical figure had this illness? Obviously, assorted historical figures have had everything from depression to diabetes, so schizophrenia probably works well here.

Yes, and it’s probably worse than described; because he was so unbelievably cruel.

No, almost certainly not. But he did a hell of a lot of them.

He was probably suggesting that Incitatus would make a better senator than those already in the senate (the horse never actually took his place there). This is pretty much the same point that Cromwell was making to Parliament when he told them 'You have no more religion than my horse' but no one thinks he was mad. On the other hand Caligula does seem to have been a bit...odd.

Incitatus was never consul.

Public opinion was not something that would bother Caligula (or the Roman "elite").


EDIT: If he could keep the Praetorians happy at home and his legions abroad onside then the opinion of the public was immaterial.

btw why bother asking the question if you think you know all the answers?

Probably not all, but incest was not unusual at the time.

Our only knowledge of Caligula is what his enemies wrote after his death. There must be some substance to their claims, but there is plenty of scope for exaggeration.

it was hardly proofed

Interesting question. Because what we do know about the notorious emperor comes from highly suspect sources.
That’s because Suetonius and Dio, who wrote the most scathing accounts of Caligula’s madness, lived decades AFTER their subject’s time and based their works on legend.
It was Suetonius who first published claims that Caligula committed incest with his three sisters. (The Roman historian added that these trysts even occurred during banquets, as guests and Caligula’s wife gathered around.) But Suetonius wrote “The Lives of the Caesars” in 121 A.D., 80 years after Caligula was assassinated at age 28 by members of the Praetorian Guard. Earlier chroniclers who actually lived under Caligula, namely Seneca and Philo, make no mention of this type of behaviour despite their harsh criticism of the emperor. And Tacitus, during a lengthy diatribe in which he accuses Caligula’s sister Agrippina—wife of the Emperor Claudius—of incest with her son, never implicates her brother.
According to Suetonius, Caligula once constructed a temporary floating bridge across the Bay of Baiae just so he could ride triumphantly from one end to the other. No traces of the stunt have ever materialized, so most historians dismiss it as myth. However, evidence of the emperor’s extravagant lifestyle has surfaced at Lake Nemi, where workers salvaged two massive pleasure barges—complete with marble décor, mosaic floors and statues—in the late 1920s and early 1930s. One of the wrecks included a lead pipe bearing the inscription “Property of Gaius Caesar Augustus Germanicus.” Which was his real name, when the respected general Germanicus brought his son Gaius on campaign, the lad sported soldier’s footwear, or caligae, scaled down to his size. Either affectionately or mockingly, Germanicus’ troops called the boy “Caligula,” meaning “Little Boots” or “Booties.” The nickname stuck, but Gaius reportedly hated it. Unfortunately, A fire caused by Allied shells largely destroyed the ships in 1944.
Modern day historians reject the notion that Caligula terrorized Rome with his unbridled madness, talking to the moon, ordering arbitrary executions and trying to make his horse a consul. For one thing, his fellow lawmakers would likely have whisked him out of power for such conduct. But assuming the much-maligned emperor was as insane as his chroniclers describe, some scholars have suggested that an illness made him come unhinged—possibly temporal lobe epilepsy, hyperthyroidism or Wilson’s disease, an inherited disorder that can cause mental instability. Hope that helps.

Yup, he was insane. He also ordered the building of a boat that covered the entire surface of a lake. It was like a floating city. It cost way too much money and the government was running out of money since he abolished taxes.



Good
Back Homepage
Back


Article Source:
www.Aphotolog.Com

Answer Questions