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during Middle Ages,was it due to poverty that children would die before they were 10?

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Submitted : 2018-06-14 21:37:55    Popularity:     

Tags: due  Ages  Middle  die  children  

Update: have heard that during the Middle Ages that 40 % of children died before aged 10? is this correct? how depended or varied? WAS THE SAME FOR WEALTHY FAMILIES? EX. NOBLES, KNIGHTS, ROYALTY? (WHERE THEY ATE PLENTY OF VEGETABLES AND FRUITS AND A

Answers:

No, not necessarily. Rich kids died too.

It was because of a lack of medical and scientific understanding of disease, primarily. Now, richer children probably had better nutrition, and thus might have had a somewhat higher rate of survival, in relation to your question about poverty, but infant mortality, even among the relatively well fed was astoundingly, heartbreakingly high.

That didn't change much until the 20th century, even with wealthy families. Many families had to have a dozen children or more to play the odds and hope that a few of them survived to adulthood. Infant and mother mortality rates were high compared with the present. This high mortality was primarily due to highly infectious disease from inadequate hygiene and poor sanitation. People were exposed to virulent diseases on a regular basis through food, water, air, and common contact. Those that made it through this gauntlet of illness would have a fairly robust immune system. Unfortunately, those that were most susceptible were children or those with compromised immune systems like new mothers. Accidents were also quite common and there was often little to do for those that suffered trauma. For example, the only thing to do with a shattered bone was amputate, which would kill the patient due to the shock or subsequent infection as often as it saved them. Even superficial wounds could lead to severe infections like gangrene, also requiring amputation, or other bloodborne illnesses that have widespread vaccines today like tetanus. Common ailments like appendicitis were essentially death sentences. The wealthy could certainly afford medical care that would not be routinely available to the general public or probably even common soldiery - see Prince Henry (later Henry V) and his serious injury at the Battle of Shrewsbury in 1403 as an example. But the wealthy were exposed and succumbed to the most common killer - disease - just as readily as anyone else.

No real doctors back then, hard conditions, often not enough food, very little heat in winter, illness, disease - there was a lot of different factors going on.

Yes, and the many diseases that could kill them, most of which are curable now,actually more uppeR class babies died or were still born, the poor let nature take it's course, but rich women and the nobility had so called doctor and midwives helping them, which often causes more trouble.

No. Their parents were anti-vaccers.

No. It was things like measles, rubella smallpox, etc that are now preventable, periodic cholera epidemics, tuberculosis or consumption. It was a lack of understanding of proper sanitation, contamination of water supplies etc and affected all strata of society. Large families were the norm, partly because there was no reliable birth control, but the chances of infants survival was so low.

that, and lack of medicine

Poor people suffered from a larger variety of life-threatening conditions. Bad food, unsafe water, cold in Winter, and just being exposed to a lot more sick people.

But the rich had their own problems. Lack of medical knowledge, lack of drugs and ways to care for the sick, plus many had problems caused by inbreeding. And having access to more expensive, more elaborately prepared food didn't necessarily mean better nutrition in the days when we didn't know about nutrition.

The fact is, infant and child mortality were near 50% right up to the start of the 20th century! In Medieval and even ancient times about half of children died before 12 or so, and this is why the 'average' life expectancy was sometimes as low as 30 years. What that really meant was that if you reached 20 you'd have an excellent chance of seeing 70. But families in the late 19th century often would have six kids hoping to get three of them to adulthood.

or disease, or malnutrition, or accidents



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