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Is it possible to force yourself to think in words and only words without the picture portion of tho

Author : pawn

Submitted : 2018-02-26 00:05:34    Popularity:     

Tags: words  force  picture  thought  portion  

Sure; just picture the words, and not the images they represent. Or, you could be picturing something else in your head, during any conversation. Sometimes, t

Answers:

Sure; just picture the words, and not the images they represent. Or, you could be picturing something else in your head, during any conversation.
Sometimes, try to just use the picture portion of thought, without speaking/thinking in words.

Lots of words in language or English don't have any images, like prepositions and articles, like a and the.

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  Not really, when you look at a blank page with only the word “ tree ” , you are looking at the word in text format, that is the picture in memory, the visual aspect of the senses, same with taste or scent, and sounds and touch, the memory senses and reacts to what each value of input is given and recoeved as interpreted in what the body knows as traits and instincts and reacts as so.

So you can think of only words, as though you were blind, and reading braille, or being told a story, but those figments visualize objective to what pt is learned, So for most, “ see spot run” is a dog running in the yard, but by word alone, one may see a spot on a paper running down the page.
 
  So in order to even read words alike heiroglyphics to us, we visualize symbols, but no meaning, might as well look at all the circles on the moon and imagine those are words in alien linguistics,

So try to understand by what you are saying as the norm,

Read: There are seven greens poles in the ground with red shoes lying on the ground.

But you can not know a green or pole or shoe or ground, if fornever seeing them, those are the limiters, memory takes in what you sense, by vision, or sound or smell, you can not describe a bell, if you never hear or see or touch one, the words per se, become empty.
..

Visualization is accomplished by processes in the frontal and parietal lobes.

Some few percentages of the population have the inability to form visualizations; the condition has a medical term: "congenital aphantasia."

The plasticity of human neural development continues throughout physical life. Thus, in theory it is possible to develop a) an aphantasia "ability" per enhancement of logical/abstract neurocircuits and/or b) a temporary effort to do so (i.e., prior to development of neurocircuitry that facilitates said "ability") and/or c) non-use of natural visualization processes in conjunction with a) and/or b).

Imho, algebraic processing tends towards the "aphantasia" or "pure logic" arena, whereas Euclidean geometric processing tends towards the integration of visualization and logic. Non-Euclidean geometry, so useful in understanding quantum phenomena, is more towards transcendental pure logic re which Kant had declared an intuitive-understanding linkage, but imho such non-Euclidean geometry may be problematic for Kant's notion of intuition and understanding.

Related: https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/geome... (imho, section 5. is most important, with section 6. being an example of clever reductionist application of Riemannian insight to physics)
"What Is Reality?", Laszlo;
"The Path of the Higher Self;"
"God's Secret Formula: Deciphering the Riddle of the Universe and the Prime Number Code."

I doubt it.

Of course it's possible. There are people who have limited vocabulary and/or limited conversation skills who cannot formally addresses the things they want to say. And I am not even talking about bilingual.

For some of us it is "natural". Meaning if some one says "Tree" to me it generates a bunch of questions about what type of tree instead of some universal "tree image".
If a person says "Car" again a bunch of questions are generated in my head about this car instead of some standard image.
The thing is I am not normal! Some of which might be genetic or it might be because I had a severe trauma to head when I was about one year old (fell out of a car going down the road 55 mph.).

I have low eidetic imagery. When I picture a car it is like imaging a body of water filling the volume where a car would be, except not water. I cannot remember any feature of a person that i have not consciously remarked on. I don’t remember or see your “handle bar mustache” i just remember thinking “wow look at that handle bar mustache.”

So no, I don’t think in images. When I write “the verdant field was awash in dewy early morning sunlight” I see a triangle of yellow over a gray plane. I am in effect internally blind, though I see perfectly well.

Don’t correct me in comments unless you are correct.

Probably not.

Yes



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