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Questions regarding talent agencies?

Author :

Submitted : 2018-06-14 20:04:15    Popularity:     

Tags: Questions  talent  agencies  

Sorry, for the amount of questions. I'm just really confused. I'm looking to get into acting. I'm taking classes and I do research on my spare time. 1) If I ever become "known", will I need an agent and manager? 2) Say I got

Answers:

YES, even before you get "KNOWN"
YES to broker the best salary
YES
NO
Possibly - depends on the agency
NO Union membership has nothing to do with the size of a role.
Anything is possible, but it is called being let go, not kicked put.
Have no idea what the requirement for membership is.

You're getting WAY ahead of yourself.
On average, it takes seven years of good-quality training and experience before you'll be good enough to get signed by an agent.
All this is included in the classes at all good acting schools, so it's best to wait until you're ready for an agent before researching all this stuff. It might have changed by then!

1) Almost absolutely. You can get some local work without one, but in order to work on TV and feature films, you will have a hard time getting auditions and being taken seriously without an agent.
2) It depends, but usually, yes. A lot of agents are model/talent agencies and will submit you for both. If it is important for you to do modeling and acting, check to make sure they do both. Once you start getting work, consider getting a publicist. They will take care of most of your media presence that is bit considered a modeling job.
3) Yes, but looks in general are considered, not just race. Agencies usually have specific people that they are looking for. They may not sign you if you look too much like other clients they represent, or if you don't look like somebody they often see in breakdowns.
4) On the sag-aftra website, you can see the licensed agencies. DO NOT submit if the agency isn't listed, as they are not often credible.

1. You will probably need an agent in order to get "known". There are not a bunch of open auditions for professional work that you can just go to and hope to be "discovered". How casting works (generally speaking) is that a production company hires a casting director (CD) to find qualified actors to audition. The CD writes a "breakdown" (a description of the project and the roles to be cast) and makes it available to agents. It's part of an agent's job to review breakdowns and submit the appropriate actors for roles. To submit means to send in an actor's professional head shot and resume listing the actor's training, experience, special skills and links to a show reel. If the CD is interested, they contact the agent to invite the actor to audition. So basically, having an agent gives more opportunities to professional roles in order to get "known".

2. Depends on what "stuff" you mean. If the picture is in relation to publicizing a show you're in, then yes your agent would negotiate that as part of your contract to do the show. If it's to publicize you, then your manager or publicist may take care of it (or maybe your agency has a publicity department so that would depend on your contract with the agency). If it is a modeling gig separate from your acting, your modeling agency would take care of things. (Acting and modeling are two different things). But basically - agents do not run your career for you. That's your job.


3. Looks pay a role in things, but talent, training, experience and marketability are more important then race outright.

4. You learn the business end of the agency. It's NOT that you just get an agent and they take care of everything and tell you where to go and what to do. It's YOUR career and so it's your responsibility to be in charge of things - no one is going to just give it to you. Basically you're starting and running your own business where you are the product to be marketed and sold. You don't just need "an agent" you need one that can help you reach your career goals. So a "good" agent for one actor may not be the best agent for another actor. Backstage.com has helpful articles about the business and Brian O'Neil has a book about acting as a business which are good places to start.

5. You can't just join an agency, it's more like they choose you. The agency only makes money if an actor books professional jobs, so yes they are going to focus more on actors who book jobs! In fact, if you don't book jobs, an agency may drop you. It's a business. One benefit of joining a big agency is that they have the industry contacts to get you opportunities. If they want they can say famous actor X would love to do the lead, we have this new actor who might be good in this supporting role, why don't you give him/her a chance.

6. Again, how it works is an agency is paid a percentage of what an actor makes. (Never pay an agency up front.) Since they only make money when people book professional jobs, they are very picky about who they take on as clients. They need actors who can book professional level jobs now (not down the road), so they're not going to be interested in beginning actors with no experience.

7. The union represents actors in collective bargaining with production studios or theaters. The production company agrees to certain conditions and the union allows actors to work on their films. (Union actors cannot work in non-union productions.) So if a show is a union production, preference is given to union actors for ALL ROLES (big and small). And you can't just join the union, you need a specific type of experience to be eligible to join the union.

8. Yes - agency do drop actors who do not get roles because (again) this is show BUSINESS, not a lottery or something. People are in it to make money, not make your dreams come true and an agency only makes money when actors book roles.

9. No - as I said before you need a specific type of experience to be eligible to join. To help you better understand SAG-AFTRA: https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index...

yes
yes
theoretically no; However people can be prejudiced and not realize it. Plus, it's how much that you can earn that makes the final decision.
look at who they represent and their results
the more notable people they have the more work they will have for other (non-stars)
yes. But it's easier if you have a existing fanbase that you can prove.
sort of... but it depends on talent
yes. Not so much kicked out, as ignored -- they depend on their commissions, and you not contributing mewans they won't try as hard for you.
check with SAG-AFTRA



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