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Motorcycle not sparking! HELP!! 1980 Honda twinstar cm200T?

Author :

Submitted : 2018-06-15 08:53:55    Popularity:     

Tags: sparking  Motorcycle  Honda  cm200T  twinstar  

I have the service manual. I have checked the coil, it is good. The plugs are good and the boots are also good. What comes before the coil to cause it to not spark? The coil is getting power and Is grounded. The points are good as well. The battery is new

Answers:

When installing points, the wires cannot touch ground (they would short out)
Inspect the wires attached to the points.
There should be a fiber washer to prevent the wire from touching ground.

Take off the point cover and see if the points come apart during part of the rotation. If the points never separate, then there is no spark at the points ergo no spark at the coil. The distance apart for the points is a set amount measured in thousandths of an inch...with a feeler gauge. Then make sure all the wires around the points and condenser is a clean neat connection (forget HAMMER TECHNOLOGY HERE) If it is all proper then it should work. Read the directions on how to install the points on the back of the package.
. Make sure it is not grounded out.

Most ignitions with points have capacitors. They shorted? They open? Gotta RLC meter? Is the coil internally shorted? That would be my guess. The varnish-type insulation on the internal primary and secondary windings breaks down eventually. You won't see it with a continuity check with a DMM's wimpy 9 volt battery. Gotta megger? I don't like to suggest just replacing stuff, but it's probably a good idea to replace the coils on a 38-year-old mc as a matter of routine electrical maintenance. The best tool to troubleshoot high voltages is a multi-channel digital memory o-scope with high voltage probes, if you really wanna see what's going on. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nQS2JGJz...

Obviously one side of the coil gets 12V. The other side should be 12V when the points are open. When the points close, that side of the coil should go to 0V. When the points open again, you should get a spark. You may have a bad condenser. Check for a spark at the tower on the coil. Points ignitions are EXTREMELY easy to trouble shoot.

Replace the condenser located by the points and problem is solved. A duff condenser may allow a spark when the plug is removed from the cylinder head, but will be snuffed out under pressure in the cylinder.

You say the points are good, that's great. Are they gapped right? It is a simple system so let me explain what happens. The coil receives voltage from the battery on the other small terminal on the coil that wire goes to the points where it is grounded. The breaking of the ground is what causes the high voltage at the coil. So if you have the points gapped correctly the only other thing that could stop the spark is the condenser, it may be shorted preventing the breaking of the grounding. To test that remove the wire from the condenser crank the engine and see if you have spark. Don't try to run it without the condenser as it will affect the timing and will not run right.

Try removing a plug and holding it in a wire to side of case while moving points with a stick, battery on; points on heels of cam.. Try for Both plugs Even thou plugs "good" and boots, wires, coil, "good", proof is in puddin'.

Double check Timing. If cam chain slipped, no way will it start. Double check points gap, ignition timing. If capacitors Ok, should get a hot spark at plug, no "arc" at points. An arc at points, New Condensor (s). They can also short; check with ohmmeter across points with points held open., ignition Off, Should show infinite ( or flashing zero)..(Note that some DMMs cant supply enough voltage to see a short as the caps run at about 120 V, so are rated to 200-250. Takes a real cap tester.)

Make Sure battery puts out 6.3 volts on cranking. If it shows 6 volts open circuit, it may fail under load. Brand new batteries have been known to be bad. Headlight Bright?

Make again double sure the ignition switch is letting a full 6.3 volts At the coil, not just a lite tester. Make sure ignition kill has clean connections, low resistance. a few ohms as said may check "fine" with a lite tester or even a cheap DVM but a couple ohms may make a difference between a hot spark and starting or a weak spark and nothing, as the coil often shows 2-4 ohms on primary. .Again pull and check connectors. Should fit tight

My 83 CB650 had an intermittent at the fuse box from the ign sw, I had to tack solder the spade lugs on. Also, the busses at fuse box were simply pressed-in at factory ; I had to also solder each connection (use low temp silver bearing solder like for plumbing, it is stronger).

EDIT 2: Last point. If all Seem good, no spark, no arc; borrow an oscilloscope, put probe on points side of coil while cranking. Should see a ringing spike of 120 volts or so down to zero , very quick. Then, it must be wires/plugs., possibly secondary of coil or very corroded hi tension connection. DO NOT put probe on HV side !! I also have an external coil tester and a capacitor checker which also detects leakage at working voltage.

EDIT: This is assuming it is electrical. Could be gas not flowing, clogged idle/.slow jets. . Get back to us when you have eliminated spark.

Lead wire from the coil to the spark plug is faulty, either the wire itself or the metal cap(s).



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