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What classes do I take in high school if I want to become a psychiatrist?

Author : Laurie

Submitted : 2018-02-26 07:13:54    Popularity:     

Tags: high  classes  psychiatrist  school  

I’m going into my sophomore year of high school and my parents are telling me I should start choosing my classes based on what I want to do in the future. I want to know what classes in high school would set me on the path of becoming a psychiatrist. By t

Answers:

A psychiatrist is a medical doctor that specializes in psychiatry.
You have to prep for medical school - heavy in science and math, and straight As.

Becoming a psychiatrist is requires commitment and planning, just becoming a doctor in any other branch of medicine does. People who want to go into medicine as a profession PLAN their careers, often years in advance. If you're really serious about going into medicine, the first thing you need to concentrate on is getting into a university or college with a good Pre-Med program. To do that, you'll need to take lots of math and science classes, including but not limited to calculus, trigonometry, algebra, geometry, and chemistry ( general and organic) biochemistry, physics, and so forth. You'll also need at least a couple years of a foreign language, as well as classes in core subjects like English, History ( US and World) Social Studies/Civics/Government, Social Sciences ( which include psychology and sociology) Health, PE, as well as electives like Human Anatomy, if you school offers such classes. In addition to all this, you need to take as many HONORS or AP classes as you possibly can. Having a perfect or near perfect GPA is extremely important if you want to get accepted into a top Pre-med program, because that's what will lay the foundation for you to go on to medical school.

Your guidance counselor can help you design a course of study which will help you get into college. Make an appointment to meet with him or her as soon as you can. In the fall of your senior year, you'll need to take the SAT's, and it's extremely important that you score well on those tests, too. College admissions staff want to see potential students with high marks and good grades, because these are the students who are most likely to succeed in doing college level work. Still another thing you need to do while you're in high school is start collecting character references from people who can help you advance your education and career. Find a mentor or mentors, and learn from them.

At some point, you and your parents will need to meet with a financial advisor who can talk about what your options are for covering the costs of both college and medical school. YOU definitely need to be working towards getting as much scholarship money as possible from whichever college or university you decide to attend. NEVER refuse scholarships, regardless of their size. Small grants can be added together with other grants to give you extra funds to pay for tuition and other costs. The more of them you can earn, the LESS money you and your parents will have to spend or take out in the form of student loans. That in turn will mean less stress and pressure on you when you finally get your degree and start your career. During your senior undergraduate year, you'll need to take the MCAT, in addition to applying to medical schools.

Once you actually get to medical school, you need to be prepared for a ROUGH ride. Medical school is HARD. It was hard when my friends who are doctors went through it, and it'll be hard a century from now. You can expect 4 years of long days, little or no sleep at times, and many, many hours of study and work. Once you start doing your clinical rotations and become an intern, the pressure on you will be even greater. I've got a sibling who's an MD, and I know what I'm talking about. And even after you graduate, you'll spend the next 3 plus years doing a residency somewhere, until you gain enough experience to either join a group practice or go out on your own- or, if you want to do this, go into teaching and/or clinical research. Not all doctors go into private or group practices, you know. There are many who go on to become educators or researchers. There are also doctors who join the armed forces and serve in military hospitals or on bases. Those who go into education or research often will return to school and get advanced academic degrees in addition to their medical degrees. These are the people who generally end up becoming faculty members at medical schools around the country and around the globe, or researchers who work for the pharmaceutical industry and in various other specialized fields. These people are special, because without them we couldn't advance our understanding of medicine and science.

Your first trip s to your guidance office, almost all schools have them set up now. This is what their job is, to lay out your options while still meeting the schools criteria. Nor all schools have the same electives and such.

Still stick to the basics. Math up to calculs, physics. Biology and chemistry.
And dont push aside English. Taking AP English language and literature are the two best classes to prepare you for university level work.
You will need to go to graduate school. So you will need a high GPA in all classes as an undergrad. You need a good base in all core subjects.

Math, science, philosophy, etc. There may not be many high school classes that will have much impact. Once you get into college, that is when you start taking classes that relate to your major. Even then, the first two years will likely be basic classes like math, science, and history.

If your school has a healthcare program (we have HOSA here in Texas) that might be a good path.

ask a guidance counselor at school



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